Veterinary Technology – Wildlife Rehabilitation

Tuition and Fees

Program Title: Veterinary Technology – Wildlife Rehabilitation
Credential Earned: Ontario College Advanced Diploma
Delivery: Full Time
Program Length: 6 Semesters

Program Status
Entry Level 1 Closed for 2015
* Still accepting applicants for year 3 (Semester 5 / Level 5)
Contact admissions@northern.on.ca for more information

Program Codes
Program codes are for September intakes except those that are indicated differently.
NORT – H134 (HL) Haileybury Campus

Program Specific Information and Forms
Below are requirements or forms that have to be completed before the start of the semester or the date specified.

Requirements for Veterinary Technology – Wildlife Rehabilitation (PDF, 247 KB)


Program Description
The Wildlife Rehabilitation program is the first of its kind in Ontario. The program is open to high school graduates, as well as graduates of a Veterinary Technician program.

This program will give students a solid foundation of scientific understanding, and wildlife rehabilitation technical skills gained through field experience. The first and second years are equivalent to the Veterinary Technician program. However, in the third year, students will receive wildlife training. Graduates will be able to explore a wide range of career opportunities in both the private and public sectors, including employment in natural resources, zoos, and wildlife parks, avian rehabilitation centers, natural bird sanctuaries, orphanage programs and any small or large animal veterinary clinic that receives injured wild animals.

All graduates are encouraged to write the provincial Registered Veterinary Technicians examination. The graduates of the Veterinary Technology – Wildlife Rehabilitation program are considered to have met the pre-requisite exam requirements for rehabilitating rabies vector species. This means that if a graduate applies for a Wildlife Custodian Authorization, he or she will be exempted from the requirement to pass the Ontario Rabies Vector Species Exam. Graduates are not exempted from the requirement to apply for and hold a Wildlife Custodian Authorization in order to independently carry out wildlife rehabilitation in Ontario.

This program is oversubscribed. Please apply by February 1st.

Career Opportunities
Graduates may find employment in private and public sectors, including natural resources, zoos, and wildlife parks, avian rehabilitation centers, natural bird sanctuaries and orphanage programs.

Contact Information
Nancy Goudreault, RVT
Veterinary Sciences Coordinator
Tel: 705-672-3376 ext. 8841
goudreaultn@northern.on.ca

Admission Requirements
This program is oversubscribed and receives more than enough qualified applicants to fill the seats available. Applicants accepted into oversubscribed programs confirm their offer and pay their fees early to reserve a place in the program.

Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD)
Grade 12 English (C, U)
Grade 12 Math (C, U)
Grade 12 Chemistry (C, U)
Grade 11 Biology (C, U)
Minimum 60% GPA in all required pre requisite courses

Or equivalent

Or mature student status (an applicant who does not have a high school diploma or equivalent, and will have reached the age of 19 years on or before the start of the program). Mature students must undergo academic testing prior to admission into a program. Call the Admissions Office at 705-235-7222 for more details. Academic prerequisites for this program may be obtained free of charge through Academic Upgrading.

Additional Admissions Requirements

  • Proficiency in word processing recommended
  • Rabies vaccine series and titre prior to start of program (at student’s expense)
  • Some experience in a veterinary clinic or hospital is considered an asset

A limited number of spots are available for graduates of Northern College’s Veterinary Assistant or Animal Grooming programs. Graduates of those programs that wish to apply to the Veterinary Technician program must have – in addition to the usual requirements for direct entry from high school – a 70 percent minimum GPA upon graduation from Veterinary Assistant or Animal Grooming programs. Applicants will be assessed according to highest academic achievement in their program.

Semester 1
EV7003 Issues in Environmental Sustainability
VT1002 Clinical Calculations I
VA1001 Animal Behaviour
VA1032 Client Relations
VT1005 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques I
VT1013 Clinical Studies I
VT1015 Animal Anatomy and Physiology I
VT1123 Kennel Duty I
VT2032 Clinical Exercises I

Semester 2
VT1012 Animal Nutrition and Digestion
VT2002 Clinical Calculations II
VT2016 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques II
VT2033 Clinical Studies II
VT2053 Animal Anatomy and Physiology II
VT2083 Radiology I
VT2123 Kennel Duty II
VT3033 Veterinary Hospital Management
VT3073 Clinical Exercises II
VT4093 Veterinary Dentistry I

Semester 3
GN1011 Employment Preparation
VT1001 RVT Preparation I
VT2042 Management Technology
VT3004 Clinical Studies III
VT3011 Veterinary Technician Surgery and Dentistry
VT3013 Laboratory Procecures and Techniques III
VT3053 Surgical Exercises I
VT3063 Pharmaceutical Principles I
VT3083 Radiology II
VT3113 Laboratory Animal Studies
VT3123 Kennel Duty III
VT4003 Clinical Exercises III
VT4075 Large Animal Medicine

Semester 4
VT4000 Field Work Placement
VT4022 Exotic Animal Studies
VT4021 RVT Preparation II
VT4032 Introduction to Wildlife
VT4033 Surgical Exercises II
VT4063 Pharmaceutical Principles II
VT4083 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques IV
VT4103 Clinical Exercises IV
VT4113 Radiology III
VT4123 Veterinary Dentistry II
VT4133 Kennel Duty IV
VT4143 Clinical Studies IV

Semester 5
WR1003 Habitat and Its Relations to Wildlife
WR1013 Avian Studies
WR1023 Mammalian Studies
WR4013 Wildlife Care I
WR5001 Facility Operations
WR5012 Field Techniques
WR5032 Biosphere Orientation

Semester 6
WR1033 Wildlife Nutrition
WR2002 Legislation and Wildlife
WR2014 Physical Therapy and Flight Management
WR2024 Reptile and Amphibian Husbandry
WR2044 Laboratory Principles and Practice
WR2052 Rehabilitation Management
WR5014 Wildlife Care II
WR6072 Offences Against Wildlife
WR6032 Outreach Programming and Promotion

Semester 1

EV7003 Issues in Environmental Sustainability
Our human society is at a crossroads in terms of our management of the environment. Population growth, and the demands it continues to place on our available resources, has resulted in a situation in which the judicious management of those resources is no longer an option. This multidisciplinary, general education course is of interest to students of all walks of life and all intended professions, as a guide to how they can learn to live more sustainably in their personal and professional lives, and, in so doing, preserve the environment for the needs and enjoyment of future generations.

VT1002 Clinical Calculations I
This is the first calculations course focusing on mathematical principles, dimensional analysis including unit conversions and the fundamentals of solutions and concentrations. Applications from nursing and the veterinary sciences are explored to show where and how mathematical techniques are required in a lab setting.

VA1001 Animal Behaviour
Animal care providers often handle animals with behaviour problems. They must know what advice to give and when to refer the problem to the veterinarian. The technician must also know the procedure involved in referral to a behavioural specialist and/or an obedience trainer.

VA1032 Client Relations
This one semester course is designed for the Animal Groomer, Veterinary Assistant and the Veterinary Technician and their role in the daily operation of a veterinary practice. The course will include sections on customer service, telephone skills, and welcoming skills, confrontation and conflict resolution. There will be a component on Client Communication utilizing both oral and written communication in the veterinary practice. This course will have a self directed on line grammar component. This course will enable the students to practice the skills required for effective work in client relations.

VT1005 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques I
This course is an introduction to laboratory procedures and practice. Students will become familiar with tests commonly and most frequently used in the veterinary laboratory. Students will acquire the proper techniques to perform tests and learn the significance of test results. An understanding of what is considered normal or abnormal will become clear. A large segment of time will be used to become familiar with quality control and the significance of its use. Hematology, sterilization, disinfection and aseptic techniques will be of special focus.

VT1013 Clinical Studies I
The course is an introduction to the responsibilities of a veterinary technician working in a clinic. It begins by emphasizing safety for both the animal and the handler in applying appropriate physical restraint. These concepts are reinforced in the concurrent first semester courses, Kennel Duty I and Clinical Exercises I. Students are alerted to other common hazards of the profession, such as those found in anesthesia, radiology. Further areas of study include: taking the history, conducting a physical examination, keeping medical records, animal identification, skin and coat care, vaccination and parasite control. In this course students learn veterinary terminology so they can communicate with other members of the veterinary team and understand the literature of the profession. The course delineates the different roles for veterinarians, technicians and assistants on the veterinary team and discusses professional organizations that determine the scope of practice for each. Students are made aware of continuing education opportunities open to graduate technicians.

VT1015 Animal Anatomy and Physiology I
Anatomy and Physiology II is a continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. Together these courses are designed to give veterinary technician students a fundamental understanding of the parts of the body, how the parts are assembled into body systems and how these systems are controlled and relate to each other. Whereas Anatomy and Physiology I focuses on integumentary, skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory and digestive systems, Anatomy and Physiology II completes the study of the body by examining the nervous system, special senses, endocrine, renal, and reproductive systems. A brief overview of avian and reptilian anatomy and physiology completes the course.

VT1123 Kennel Duty I
This course will prepare the student to function in a veterinary environment. Students will provide care for the animals owned by Northern College. The use of Standard Operating Procedures will assist the student. The Veterinary Science facility simulates the professional environment and enables the students to learn the skills necessary to function as a productive team member.

VT2032 Clinical Exercises I
This course will give students the technical skills required to be successful in a veterinary clinic. Subjects include oral and parenteral administration of medications, various methods of sample collection, ophthalmic and otic treatments, restraint, grooming and bandaging techniques.

Semester 2

VT1012 Animal Nutrition and Digestion
Topics covered include classes of nutrients, principles of nutrition and digestion, specialized digestive structures, roles of specific nutrients, dietary requirements and the formulation of diets for different animal classes, nutrient deficiencies, determining relative economic value of feed products, therapeutic diets, and the effect of the environment of nutrient requirements.

VT2002 Clinical Calculations II
This is the second calculations course focusing on drug dosage calculations. The learner will perform calculations to reconstitute drugs, determine dosages based on body weight and body surface area and route of administration. Applications from nursing and the veterinary sciences are explored to show where and how mathematical techniques are required in a lab setting. Prerequisite: VT1002 Clinical Calculations I.

VT2016 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques II
This course is a continuation of Laboratory Procedures and Techniques I. Students will study clinical chemistry, urinalysis and cytology while practising the techniques taught in the first semester. Special care will be placed on understanding the consequence of failure to report accurate results. Confidence limits will be stressed. The final exam for this semester will include material from the first and second semesters. Prerequisites: VT1019 Anatomy and Physiology I; VT 1005 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques I; VT1002 Clinical Calculations I.

VT2033 Clinical Studies II
The role of veterinary professionals in managing behaviour problems of dogs and cats will be examined. The course includes discussion of ways to prevent and treat behavioural problems, as well as the appropriate procedure for referring clients who desire resolution of their animal’s behavioural problems. Common problems such as house training, destructive scratching in cats and destructive chewing in dogs are covered. An in-depth discussion of anaesthesia and analgesia completes the course. Prerequisites: VT1013 Clinical Studies I; VT1019 Anatomy and Physiology I; VT2002 Clinical Calculations I; VT1005 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques I.

VT2053 Animal Anatomy and Physiology II
Anatomy and Physiology II is a continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. Together these courses are designed to give veterinary technician students a fundamental understanding of the parts of the body, how the parts are assembled into body systems and how these systems are controlled and relate to each other. Whereas Anatomy and Physiology I focuses on integumentary, skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory and digestive systems, Anatomy and Physiology II completes the study of the body by examining the nervous system, special senses, endocrine, renal, and reproductive systems. A brief overview of avian and reptilian anatomy and physiology completes the course.

VT2083 Radiology I
This course will introduce the student to imaging techniques, concentrating on radiology with some basics of ultrasonography, computed tomography and nuclear scintigraphy. The physics of radiology, the safe and efficient preparation, exposure and processing of radiographs will be discussed in great detail. The student will also learn technical evaluation and correction of radiographs.

VT2123 Kennel Duty II
This course will prepare the student to function in a veterinary environment. Students will provide care for the animals owned by Northern College. The use of Standard Operating Procedures will assist the student. The Veterinary Science facility simulates the professional environment and enables the students to learn the skills necessary to function as a productive team member.

VT3033 Veterinary Hospital Management
This course orients veterinary technicians to practice management with emphasis on marketing, communications, business operations, inventory control, appointment scheduling, emergency calls, standard operating procedures and maintenance and retrieval of records. By understanding the legalities that impact on veterinary practice, while at the same time appreciating the need to conserve costs and increase practice income, the graduating technician will be better prepared to contribute to the effective operation of the practice. The student will be expected to apply communication skills developed in the Client Relations course.

VT3073 Clinical Exercises II
In this competency-based course, students build upon previously acquired skills and increase their efficiency and understanding. While functioning as part of a group, students participate in physical examinations, intramuscular, subcutaneous and intravenous injection techniques, restraint of small animal patients, surgical preparations, anal gland expression, enema administration and taking blood. Students are marked on skill and willingness to participate. Prerequisites: VT2032 Clinical Exercises I; VT1002 Clinical Calculations I.

VT4093 Veterinary Dentistry I
This course is intended to be comprehensive, bringing students from relatively little knowledge in veterinary dentistry to a practical, working knowledge. The course will include sections on oral examination and disease recognition, dental instruments and equipment, anaesthesia, and pathogenesis. Prerequisite: VT1019 Anatomy and Physiology I.

Semester 3

GN1011 Employment Preparation
This course will enable the students to become familiar with specific employment requirements for their field of interest. The students will also have the opportunity to learn how to self-market for job finding, as well as how to maximize their potential for success in an interview situation. This course is designed to assist students in obtaining employment. Students will also learn to prepare themselves for varied Fieldwork Placements. This semester will concentrate on incorporating skills from the Client Relations Course to further develop their interpersonal communication skills through their ability to prepare for an employment interview. The course will also discuss work ethics and the role they play in long term employ ability.

VT1001 RVT Preparation I
This course consists of weekly study sessions to help graduating students prepare to challenge their professional registry examination, the Veterinary Technician National Examination (VTNE). The content reflects the practice domains covered by the VTNE, currently set up as follows:

Domain 1. Pharmacy & Pharmacology
Domain 2. Surgical Prep & Assisting
Domain 3. Dentistry Procedures
Domain 4. Laboratory Procedures
Domain 5. Animal Nursing
Domain 6. Radiography, Ultrasound
Domain 7. Anesthesia

It is recognized that acquisition of medical vocabulary is essential in answering many VTNE questions, as is proficiency in basic mathematical calculations. Students will review strategies considered helpful in taking multiple choice tests. Examples of typical RVT questions will be covered in this class. Questions the instructor considers “essential RVT knowledge” will be highlighted. It should be noted that the instructor never sees the actual paper RVT candidates write, but is presenting an “educated guess” on material likely to be on the exam. The Angoff method of scoring which the VTNE uses is explained.

VT2042 Management Technology
The purpose of this course is to develop the skills necessary to use computer programs specific to the veterinary environment. The student will learn to navigate through programs such as Impromed and Vetware.

VT3004 Clinical Studies III
Clinical Studies III is a continuation of the Veterinary Technology series that began with Clinical Studies I and II. It begins with the topics of Surgical Nursing, Wound Closure and Homeostasis, Fractures and Other Injuries, and concludes with the topic of Emergency Care. These subjects will prepare the students for the work they will see in their placements and in their future profession.

VT3011 Veterinary Technician Surgery and Dentistry
Under the supervision of a supervising veterinarian, students anaesthetize and carry out minor surgical procedures as directed. Prerequisites: VT2008 Anatomy and Physiology II; VT2033 Clinical Studies II; VT3073 Clinical Exercises II; VT2002 Clinical Calculations II; VT2016 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques II.

VT3013 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques III
This course is a continuation of Laboratory Procedures and Techniques I and II. A review of health and safety standards will help to ensure students’ well being and safety. Parasitology, virology and immunology will be stressed this semester. Abnormal hematology and chemistry cases will be reviewed to provide continuing development of laboratory expertise. The final exam for this semester will cover material from the first two semesters as well as the third semester. Prerequisite:VT2016 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques II, VT3073 Clinical Exercises II.

VT3053 Surgical Exercises I
This course is a practical training session for veterinary technicians to become familiar with anesthesia and surgical procedures. There is a heavy emphasis on supervised hands on experience. The class is divided into small groups for better supervision and learning. Each group is responsible for taking a patient from the preoperative examination and laboratory evaluation through to patient recovery and return to the owner. Prerequisites: VT2008 Anatomy and Physiology II; VT2033 Clinical Studies II; VT3073 Clinical Exercises II; VT2016 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques II; VT2002 Clinical Calculations II.

VT3063 Pharmaceutical Principles I
This is the first of two courses which together provide a comprehensive review of important groups of drugs used in veterinary medicine. The course begins with general aspects of pharmacology, such as the sources of drugs, their modes of action, dosage forms and pharmacokinetics, but progresses to discuss in detail those drugs which are used to correct disorders in specific body systems. In this first course, drugs affecting the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems are covered. In addition, the student is required to calculate doses accurately and understand the components of a prescription. The student is introduced to specific legislation affecting the storage and dispensing of pharmaceuticals. Through this knowledge, the technician is able to help a veterinary practice meet its legal responsibilities. Prerequisites: VT2008 Anatomy and Physiology II; VT2033 Clinical Studies II; VT2002 Clinical Calculations II.

VT3083 Radiology II
This course offers students the opportunity to put into practice the knowledge obtained in Radiology I. Students will be placed in small groups and be expected to take x-rays using all safety techniques and guidelines as demonstrated by the professor. Students will be evaluated on their professionalism and the quality of the x-ray produced. Prerequisites: VT2083, Radiology I; VT2002 Clinical Calculations II.

VT3113 Laboratory Animal Studies
Students will already have had considerable practice in the care and handling of cats and dogs. This course will teach them the theory and practicalities of maintaining and handling common laboratory animals. Students will appreciate that these same species are presented at the veterinary clinic as pocket pets and that the knowledge gained in this course has application to private practice as well as to the laboratory animal field.

VT3123 Kennel Duty III
This course will prepare the student to function in a veterinary environment. Students will provide care for the animals owned by Northern College. The use of Standard Operating Procedures will assist the student. The Veterinary Science facility simulates the professional environment and enables the students to learn the skills necessary to function as a productive team member.

VT4003 Clinical Exercises III
In this course the student will repeatedly practice the skills learned in Clinical Exercises I and Clinical Exercises II, while learning new skills that will be necessary to perform the tasks of a Veterinary Technician. These new skills include bandaging techniques, recognizing and diagnosing several dermatology problems, performing enemas, collecting urine samples, and suturing. Whenever possible, students will develop competency of new skills on models before attempting procedures on live animals.

VT4075 Large Animal Medicine
This course will deal with the general needs of large animal veterinary practice. The veterinary technician will develop an appreciation for livestock medical and surgical techniques, and commonly encountered conditions. The student will acquire general understanding of clinical procedures, bandaging, reproduction, bio-security, animal handling and restraint. Proper sample collection and animal identification for official certificates will be reviewed. The student will also become familiar with the general clinical examination of equine and ruminant species. During the laboratory sessions, students will be given the opportunity to apply many of the techniques covered during lecture.

Semester 4
VT4000 Field Work Placement
Students will be expected to spend four weeks at the clinic where they have arranged placement. The clinic must be able to provide the necessary work experiences. It is expected that students will perform the duties regularly expected of a new graduate with the same experience level. This will give students the opportunity to experience clinic life, then return to school to apply the newly gained knowledge and expertise to their schoolwork. Prerequisites: All courses in Semesters I, II and III must be completed successfully prior to placement.

VT4022 Exotic Animal Studies
This course offers the student the opportunity to learn about exotic companion animal species and their care. Upon completion of this course the student will have the following knowledge and skills: principles of handling, housing and husbandry of avian companion animals, exotic reptile and amphibian companion animals and small exotic mammal companion animals. Common nutritional and transmissible diseases of these animals are also addressed.

VT4021 RVT Preparation II
The course prepares students to challenge their national professional examination and become registered veterinary technicians.

VT4032 Introduction to Wildlife
This course offers the student the opportunity to learn about wildlife rehabilitation in Ontario. Upon completion of this course the student will have the following knowledge and skills: Principles of wildlife rehabilitation and relevant Ontario legislation, characteristics and taxonomy of various orders and families of North American wildlife, basic concepts of housing and husbandry for wildlife species, and digestion and nutrition of wildlife.

VT4033 Surgical Exercises II
This course is a continuation of the practical training needed for veterinary technicians to become familiar with surgical procedures. Students practise their skills while participating in a surgical team. New procedures that were not previously covered in Surgical Exercises I are added. The class is divided into small working groups to allow an optimum supervisor to student ratio. Each team is responsible for taking a patient from pre-surgical examination and laboratory screening through to patient recovery and return to the owner. Routine veterinary procedures are practised under anaesthesia. Prerequisites : VT3053 Surgical Exercises I; VT4003 Clinical Exercises III; VT3004 Clinical Studies III; VT3013 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques III.

VT4063 Pharmaceutical Principles II
This course is a continuation of Pharmaceutical Principles I. Together these courses are designed to give veterinary technician students a fundamental understanding of general aspects of pharmacology, while covering in more detail specific classes of drugs that are important in veterinary medicine, such as antimicrobials, anesthetics and antiparasitics. Prerequisite: VT3063 Pharmaceutical Principles I.

VT4083 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques IV
This is the final course in the Laboratory Procedures and Techniques series. The disciplines of microbiology and mycology will be taught in this semester. Additional time will be allocated to develop students’ proficiency in all areas of lab techniques. The final exam in this semester will include material from all four semesters. Prerequisite:VT3013 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques III.

VT4103 Clinical Exercises IV
In this competency-based course, the student builds upon previously acquired skills and increases their efficiency and understanding. The purposed of this course is to bring together all the information they have learned over the past three semesters and apply it to a clinic setting. Students will work independently and in a professional manner. The student will spend some time doing independent research and the remainder of the class practicing skills.

VT4113 Radiology III
This course is a continuation of Radiology II. Each student will be assigned to a small group and this group will be expected to carry out the x-ray techniques as requested. Students will be marked on the quality of the x-ray film as well as their professional conduct. Prerequisite: VT3083 Radiology II.

VT4123 Veterinary Dentistry II
This course gives the student the opportunity to practise the skills needed to perform dental prophylaxis. The knowledge gained in Dentistry I will be put into practice. Students will be marked on their basic knowledge of instruments, techniques and their willingness to attempt the skills demonstrated by the professor. Prerequisite: VT4093 Veterinary Dentistry I; VT3083 Radiology II; VT3004 Clinical Studies III.

VT4133 Kennel Duty IV
This course will prepare the student to function in a veterinary environment. Students will provide care for the animals owned by Northern College. The use of Standard Operating Procedures will assist the student. The Veterinary Science facility simulates the professional environment and enables the students to learn the skills necessary to function as a productive team member.

VT4143 Clinical Studies IV
Clinical Studies IV is a continuation of the veterinary technician clinical studies series, whose courses prepare students for work they will see in their future profession. This course emphasizes aspects of emergency care, primarily for dogs and cats, where technicians can be useful in assisting the veterinarian in the diagnosis and therapeutic approach to the critically ill patient from basic and advanced life support to intensive nursing care. The course deals with nursing procedures, such as fluid therapy, blood transfusions, oxygen therapy, nutritional support of hospitalized patients, dystocia, trauma, ocular, urogenital, gastrointestinal and neurologic emergencies. Emergency care of exotic pets and caged birds is also covered. There is a brief overview of advanced imaging technologies, such as computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and endoscopy.

Semester 5

WR1003 Habitat and Its Relations to Wildlife
This course deals with techniques used in the field regarding both rescue and/or recovery to the release of wildlife. How to track and deal with or prevent human/wildlife conflicts are discussed. Proper planning to the implementation of a rescue plan is reviewed. Usage of the proper equipment for different species and different handling and release training techniques are reviewed.

WR1013 Avian Studies
This course deals with the biology and behaviour of Ontario’s native birds from the rehabilitation perspective. The visual identification of both adult and young birds is covered. The life histories of representative species are reviewed with emphasis on the provision of appropriate rehabilitation care. Adaptations of these species to their environment and ecological niche are discussed, along with their impact on the rehabilitation process.

WR1023 Mammalian Studies
This course deals with the biology and behaviour of Ontario’s native mammals. The visual identification of both adults and young animals is covered. The life histories of representative species are reviewed with emphasis on the provision of appropriate rehabilitory care. Adaptations of these species to their environment and ecological niche are discussed.

WR4013 Wildlife Care I
This course deals with what is required to provide care in the initial stages for wildlife in need. The perspective direction will focus on the practical aspects and the clerical aspects that need to be dealt with for both mammalian and avian species from their arrival to their release. Additionally, students will be introduced to techniques that relate to wound management, bandaging techniques, initial wound care and how to perform these tasks safely.

WR5001 Facility Operations
Upon completion of this course the student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of what the demands for maintaining and operating a wildlife facility are. The student will be able to explain how to create policies and procedures so as to have a safe and secure working environment. The student will also be able to demonstrate their ability to plan for and execute emergency/disaster protocols.

WR5012 Field Techniques
This course deals with techniques used in the field regarding both rescue and/or recovery to the release of wildlife. How to track and deal with or prevent human/wildlife conflicts are discussed. Proper planning to the implementation of a rescue plan is reviewed. Usage of the proper equipment for different species and different handling and release training techniques are reviewed.

WR5022 Legislation and Wildlife
This course deals with legislative issues as it relates to wildlife and the role of the student as a Wildlife Custodian. Relevant sections of the Ministry of Natural Resources (Ontario) Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act, 1997 will be dealt with. Regulations specific to Wildlife Custodian Authorization will be dealt with in depth. This course will also deal with issues of trespassing upon private and public lands for the purpose of rescuing or recovering wildlife that is in need of assistance. Students will also be introduced to Federal acts and regulation that are relevant to wildlife and wildlife rehabilitation. The course will enlighten the student on the work carried out by provincial and federal committees, who are studying endangered species. Legislative issues relevant to First Nation’s people will be addressed.

WR5032 Biosphere Orientation
The field of wildlife rehabilitation involves a significant amount of work and time spent in the out of doors, both at the rehabilitation facilities and in the field. This course covers the skills and knowledge base which is required for those working in the natural environment to work safely and efficiently.

Semester 6

WR1033 Wildlife Nutrition
Various aspects of feeding and nutrition in wildlife care are addressed in this course; these would include requirements for energy, protein, minerals, vitamins, and hydration. Various diets will be assessed as to the practicality and palatability to the wild animal. Diseases brought on by an incorrect or poor diet will be discussed as well as practical ways to correct the diet.

WR2014 Physical Therapy and Flight Management
Lecture topics include a basic overview of the principles of physical therapy and some pertinent anatomy and physiology. Flight management will be discussed and practised based on the wellness level of the rehabilitation bird. Ideas on how to setup a physical therapy program for a given species and a given injury will be discussed and shared. The lab portion consists of a series of exercises done on class participants and case reviews. Some practice animals will be provided as available. Some normal birds may be used to demonstrate particular techniques.

WR2024 Reptile and Amphibian Husbandry
Reptiles and amphibians will be discussed and evaluated for their specialized survival skills. Native Canadian reptiles and amphibians will be emphasized. Specialized treatment, diet housing, disease control and prevention, physical restraint, release and euthanasia will be studied in this course. The students for the assessment of behavioral patterns will view reptiles and amphibians.

WR2044 Laboratory Principles and Practice
Commonly performed laboratory procedures and techniques will be addressed in this course. Fecal flotation for detection of parasites will be emphasized as well as interpretation of results from a reference lab. Special emphasis will be placed on quality control and record keeping. Zoonotic diseases and contagions will be discussed during the lecture component of this course.

WR2052 Rehabilitation Management
Upon completion of this course the student will possess a working competence and capability as it relates to the designing and building of enrichment devices and enclosure environments that support rehabilitation management. This is accomplished through hands-on build projects.

WR5014 Wildlife Care II
Upon completion of this course, the student will know how their contact and interaction with wildlife can influence the eventual release. Students will be introduced to a wide range of diseases as well as disease specimen collection and handling. Additionally, students will be introduced to different toxins that can affect the well-being of wildlife and different pharmaceuticals which are being used in wildlife rehabilitation.

WR6072 Offences Against Wildlife
This course deals with offences committed against wildlife. As an advocate and care giver of wildlife, a wildlife custodian is often one of the first persons to encounter a wildlife species that may have been victimized through some illegal act. This encounter is usually the first step in an involved process that may bring an offender to justice. This process will bring the custodian into contact with law enforcement agencies and possibly the court, lawyers and judges. Understanding legal processes, investigative techniques, crime scene processing and presenting the evidence are all crucial aspects of successfully resolving a crime committed against wildlife.

WR6032 Outreach Programming and Promotion
Outreach, Programming & Promotion is a one-semester course which builds on the knowledge acquired during your years in the Veterinary Technician Program in addition to some of the skills gained in your first semester Wildlife Rehabilitation courses. The course presents the theory and practice necessary for the planning and presentation of short business outlines, funding applications, proposals and short oral reports. In addition, the course introduces the techniques and dynamics of advertising and media coverage.