Veterinary Technology – Wildlife Rehabilitation

Tuition and Fees

Program Title: Veterinary Technology – Wildlife Rehabilitation
Credential Earned: Ontario College Advanced Diploma
Delivery: Full Time
Program Length: 6 Semesters

Program Status
Entry Level 1 Closed for 2015
* Still accepting applicants for year 3 (Semester 5 / Level 5)
Contact admissions@northern.on.ca for more information

Program Codes
NORT – H134 (HL) Haileybury Campus
Program codes are for September intakes except those that are indicated differently.


Program Description
The Wildlife Rehabilitation program is the first of its kind in Ontario. The program is open to high school graduates, as well as graduates of a Veterinary Technician program.

This program will give students a solid foundation of scientific understanding, and wildlife rehabilitation technical skills gained through field experience. The first and second years are equivalent to the Veterinary Technician program. However, in the third year, students will receive wildlife training. Graduates will be able to explore a wide range of career opportunities in both the private and public sectors, including employment in natural resources, zoos, and wildlife parks, avian rehabilitation centers, natural bird sanctuaries, orphanage programs and any small or large animal veterinary clinic that receives injured wild animals.

All graduates are encouraged to write the provincial Registered Veterinary Technicians examination. The graduates of the Veterinary Technology – Wildlife Rehabilitation program are considered to have met the pre-requisite exam requirements for rehabilitating rabies vector species. This means that if a graduate applies for a Wildlife Custodian Authorization, he or she will be exempted from the requirement to pass the Ontario Rabies Vector Species Exam. Graduates are not exempted from the requirement to apply for and hold a Wildlife Custodian Authorization in order to independently carry out wildlife rehabilitation in Ontario.

This program is oversubscribed. Please apply by February 1st.

Career Opportunities
Graduates may find employment in private and public sectors, including natural resources, zoos, and wildlife parks, avian rehabilitation centers, natural bird sanctuaries and orphanage programs.

Contact Information
Nancy Goudreault, RVT
Veterinary Sciences Coordinator
Tel: 705-672-3376 ext. 8841
goudreaultn@northern.on.ca

Admission Requirements
This program is oversubscribed and receives more than enough qualified applicants to fill the seats available. Applicants accepted into oversubscribed programs confirm their offer and pay their fees early to reserve a place in the program.

Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD)
Grade 12 English (C, U)
Grade 12 Math (C, U)
Grade 12 Chemistry (C, U)
Grade 11 Biology (C, U)
Minimum 60% GPA in all required pre requisite courses

Or equivalent

Or mature student status (an applicant who does not have a high school diploma or equivalent, and will have reached the age of 19 years on or before the start of the program). Mature students must undergo academic testing prior to admission into a program. Call the Admissions Office at 705-235-7222 for more details. Academic prerequisites for this program may be obtained free of charge through Academic Upgrading.

Additional Admissions Requirements

  • Proficiency in word processing recommended
  • Rabies vaccine series and titre prior to start of program (at student’s expense)
  • Some experience in a veterinary clinic or hospital is considered an asset

A limited number of spots are available for graduates of Northern College’s Veterinary Assistant or Animal Grooming programs. Graduates of those programs that wish to apply to the Veterinary Technician program must have – in addition to the usual requirements for direct entry from high school – a 70 percent minimum GPA upon graduation from Veterinary Assistant or Animal Grooming programs. Applicants will be assessed according to highest academic achievement in their program.

Semester 1
EV7003 Issues in Environmental Sustainability
VT1002 Clinical Calculations I
VA1001 Animal Behaviour
VA1032 Client Relations
VT1005 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques I
VT1013 Clinical Studies I
VT1015 Animal Anatomy and Physiology I
VT1123 Kennel Duty I
VT2032 Clinical Exercises I

Semester 2
VT1012 Animal Nutrition and Digestion
VT2002 Clinical Calculations II
VT2016 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques II
VT2033 Clinical Studies II
VT2053 Animal Anatomy and Physiology II
VT2083 Radiology I
VT2123 Kennel Duty II
VT3033 Veterinary Hospital Management
VT3073 Clinical Exercises II
VT4093 Veterinary Dentistry I

Semester 3
GN1011 Employment Preparation
VT1001 RVT Preparation I
VT2042 Management Technology
VT3004 Clinical Studies III
VT3011 Veterinary Technician Surgery and Dentistry
VT3013 Laboratory Procecures and Techniques III
VT3053 Surgical Exercises I
VT3063 Pharmaceutical Principles I
VT3083 Radiology II
VT3113 Laboratory Animal Studies
VT3123 Kennel Duty III
VT4003 Clinical Exercises III
VT4075 Large Animal Medicine

Semester 4
VT4000 Field Work Placement
VT4022 Exotic Animal Studies
VT4021 RVT Preparation II
VT4032 Introduction to Wildlife
VT4033 Surgical Exercises II
VT4063 Pharmaceutical Principles II
VT4083 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques IV
VT4103 Clinical Exercises IV
VT4113 Radiology III
VT4123 Veterinary Dentistry II
VT4133 Kennel Duty IV
VT4143 Clinical Studies IV

Semester 5
WR1003 Habitat and Its Relations to Wildlife
WR1013 Avian Studies
WR1023 Mammalian Studies
WR4013 Wildlife Care I
WR5001 Facility Operations
WR5012 Field Techniques
WR5032 Biosphere Orientation

Semester 6
WR1033 Wildlife Nutrition
WR2002 Legislation and Wildlife
WR2014 Physical Therapy and Flight Management
WR2024 Reptile and Amphibian Husbandry
WR2044 Laboratory Principles and Practice
WR2052 Rehabilitation Management
WR5014 Wildlife Care II
WR6072 Offences Against Wildlife
WR6032 Outreach Programming and Promotion

Semester 1

EV7003 Issues in Environmental Sustainability
Our human society is at a crossroads in terms of our management of the environment. Population growth, and the demands it continues to place on our available resources, has resulted in a situation in which the judicious management of those resources is no longer an option. This multidisciplinary, general education course is of interest to students of all walks of life and all intended professions, as a guide to how they can learn to live more sustainably in their personal and professional lives, and, in so doing, preserve the environment for the needs and enjoyment of future generations.

VT1002 Clinical Calculations I
This is the first calculations course focusing on mathematical principles, dimensional analysis including unit conversions and the fundamentals of solutions and concentrations. Applications from nursing and the veterinary sciences are explored to show where and how mathematical techniques are required in a lab setting.

VA1001 Animal Behaviour
Animal care providers often handle animals with behaviour problems. They must know what advice to give and when to refer the problem to the veterinarian. The technician must also know the procedure involved in referral to a behavioural specialist and/or an obedience trainer.

VA1032 Client Relations
This one semester course is designed for the Animal Groomer, Veterinary Assistant and the Veterinary Technician and their role in the daily operation of a veterinary practice. The course will include sections on customer service, telephone skills, and welcoming skills, confrontation and conflict resolution. There will be a component on Client Communication utilizing both oral and written communication in the veterinary practice. This course will have a self directed on line grammar component. This course will enable the students to practice the skills required for effective work in client relations.

VT1005 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques I
This course is an introduction to laboratory procedures and practice. Students will become familiar with tests commonly and most frequently used in the veterinary laboratory. Students will acquire the proper techniques to perform tests and learn the significance of test results. An understanding of what is considered normal or abnormal will become clear. A large segment of time will be used to become familiar with quality control and the significance of its use. Hematology, sterilization, disinfection and aseptic techniques will be of special focus.

VT1013 Clinical Studies I
The course is an introduction to the responsibilities of a veterinary technician working in a clinic. It begins by emphasizing safety for both the animal and the handler in applying appropriate physical restraint. These concepts are reinforced in the concurrent first semester courses, Kennel Duty I and Clinical Exercises I. Students are alerted to other common hazards of the profession, such as those found in anesthesia, radiology. Further areas of study include: taking the history, conducting a physical examination, keeping medical records, animal identification, skin and coat care, vaccination and parasite control. In this course students learn veterinary terminology so they can communicate with other members of the veterinary team and understand the literature of the profession. The course delineates the different roles for veterinarians, technicians and assistants on the veterinary team and discusses professional organizations that determine the scope of practice for each. Students are made aware of continuing education opportunities open to graduate technicians.

VT1015 Animal Anatomy and Physiology I
Anatomy and Physiology II is a continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. Together these courses are designed to give veterinary technician students a fundamental understanding of the parts of the body, how the parts are assembled into body systems and how these systems are controlled and relate to each other. Whereas Anatomy and Physiology I focuses on integumentary, skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory and digestive systems, Anatomy and Physiology II completes the study of the body by examining the nervous system, special senses, endocrine, renal, and reproductive systems. A brief overview of avian and reptilian anatomy and physiology completes the course.

VT1123 Kennel Duty I
This course will prepare the student to function in a veterinary environment. Students will provide care for the animals owned by Northern College. The use of Standard Operating Procedures will assist the student. The Veterinary Science facility simulates the professional environment and enables the students to learn the skills necessary to function as a productive team member.

VT2032 Clinical Exercises I
This course will give students the technical skills required to be successful in a veterinary clinic. Subjects include oral and parenteral administration of medications, various methods of sample collection, ophthalmic and otic treatments, restraint, grooming and bandaging techniques.

Semester 2

VT1012 Animal Nutrition and Digestion
Topics covered include classes of nutrients, principles of nutrition and digestion, specialized digestive structures, roles of specific nutrients, dietary requirements and the formulation of diets for different animal classes, nutrient deficiencies, determining relative economic value of feed products, therapeutic diets, and the effect of the environment of nutrient requirements.

VT2002 Clinical Calculations II
This is the second calculations course focusing on drug dosage calculations. The learner will perform calculations to reconstitute drugs, determine dosages based on body weight and body surface area and route of administration. Applications from nursing and the veterinary sciences are explored to show where and how mathematical techniques are required in a lab setting. Prerequisite: VT1002 Clinical Calculations I.

VT2016 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques II
This course is a continuation of Laboratory Procedures and Techniques I. Students will study clinical chemistry, urinalysis and cytology while practising the techniques taught in the first semester. Special care will be placed on understanding the consequence of failure to report accurate results. Confidence limits will be stressed. The final exam for this semester will include material from the first and second semesters. Prerequisites: VT1019 Anatomy and Physiology I; VT 1005 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques I; VT1002 Clinical Calculations I.

VT2033 Clinical Studies II
The role of veterinary professionals in managing behaviour problems of dogs and cats will be examined. The course includes discussion of ways to prevent and treat behavioural problems, as well as the appropriate procedure for referring clients who desire resolution of their animal’s behavioural problems. Common problems such as house training, destructive scratching in cats and destructive chewing in dogs are covered. An in-depth discussion of anaesthesia and analgesia completes the course. Prerequisites: VT1013 Clinical Studies I; VT1019 Anatomy and Physiology I; VT2002 Clinical Calculations I; VT1005 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques I.

VT2053 Animal Anatomy and Physiology II
Anatomy and Physiology II is a continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. Together these courses are designed to give veterinary technician students a fundamental understanding of the parts of the body, how the parts are assembled into body systems and how these systems are controlled and relate to each other. Whereas Anatomy and Physiology I focuses on integumentary, skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory and digestive systems, Anatomy and Physiology II completes the study of the body by examining the nervous system, special senses, endocrine, renal, and reproductive systems. A brief overview of avian and reptilian anatomy and physiology completes the course.

VT2083 Radiology I
This course will introduce the student to imaging techniques, concentrating on radiology with some basics of ultrasonography, computed tomography and nuclear scintigraphy. The physics of radiology, the safe and efficient preparation, exposure and processing of radiographs will be discussed in great detail. The student will also learn technical evaluation and correction of radiographs.

VT2123 Kennel Duty II
This course will prepare the student to function in a veterinary environment. Students will provide care for the animals owned by Northern College. The use of Standard Operating Procedures will assist the student. The Veterinary Science facility simulates the professional environment and enables the students to learn the skills necessary to function as a productive team member.

VT3033 Veterinary Hospital Management
This course orients veterinary technicians to practice management with emphasis on marketing, communications, business operations, inventory control, appointment scheduling, emergency calls, standard operating procedures and maintenance and retrieval of records. By understanding the legalities that impact on veterinary practice, while at the same time appreciating the need to conserve costs and increase practice income, the graduating technician will be better prepared to contribute to the effective operation of the practice. The student will be expected to apply communication skills developed in the Client Relations course.

VT3073 Clinical Exercises II
In this competency-based course, students build upon previously acquired skills and increase their efficiency and understanding. While functioning as part of a group, students participate in physical examinations, intramuscular, subcutaneous and intravenous injection techniques, restraint of small animal patients, surgical preparations, anal gland expression, enema administration and taking blood. Students are marked on skill and willingness to participate. Prerequisites: VT2032 Clinical Exercises I; VT1002 Clinical Calculations I.

VT4093 Veterinary Dentistry I
This course is intended to be comprehensive, bringing students from relatively little knowledge in veterinary dentistry to a practical, working knowledge. The course will include sections on oral examination and disease recognition, dental instruments and equipment, anaesthesia, and pathogenesis. Prerequisite: VT1019 Anatomy and Physiology I.

Semester 3

GN1011 Employment Preparation
This course will enable the students to become familiar with specific employment requirements for their field of interest. The students will also have the opportunity to learn how to self-market for job finding, as well as how to maximize their potential for success in an interview situation. This course is designed to assist students in obtaining employment. Students will also learn to prepare themselves for varied Fieldwork Placements. This semester will concentrate on incorporating skills from the Client Relations Course to further develop their interpersonal communication skills through their ability to prepare for an employment interview. The course will also discuss work ethics and the role they play in long term employ ability.

VT1001 RVT Preparation I
This course consists of weekly study sessions to help graduating students prepare to challenge their professional registry examination, the Veterinary Technician National Examination (VTNE). The content reflects the practice domains covered by the VTNE, currently set up as follows:

Domain 1. Pharmacy & Pharmacology
Domain 2. Surgical Prep & Assisting
Domain 3. Dentistry Procedures
Domain 4. Laboratory Procedures
Domain 5. Animal Nursing
Domain 6. Radiography, Ultrasound
Domain 7. Anesthesia

It is recognized that acquisition of medical vocabulary is essential in answering many VTNE questions, as is proficiency in basic mathematical calculations. Students will review strategies considered helpful in taking multiple choice tests. Examples of typical RVT questions will be covered in this class. Questions the instructor considers “essential RVT knowledge” will be highlighted. It should be noted that the instructor never sees the actual paper RVT candidates write, but is presenting an “educated guess” on material likely to be on the exam. The Angoff method of scoring which the VTNE uses is explained.

VT2042 Management Technology
The purpose of this course is to develop the skills necessary to use computer programs specific to the veterinary environment. The student will learn to navigate through programs such as Impromed and Vetware.

VT3004 Clinical Studies III
Clinical Studies III is a continuation of the Veterinary Technology series that began with Clinical Studies I and II. It begins with the topics of Surgical Nursing, Wound Closure and Homeostasis, Fractures and Other Injuries, and concludes with the topic of Emergency Care. These subjects will prepare the students for the work they will see in their placements and in their future profession.

VT3011 Veterinary Technician Surgery and Dentistry
Under the supervision of a supervising veterinarian, students anaesthetize and carry out minor surgical procedures as directed. Prerequisites: VT2008 Anatomy and Physiology II; VT2033 Clinical Studies II; VT3073 Clinical Exercises II; VT2002 Clinical Calculations II; VT2016 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques II.

VT3013 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques III
This course is a continuation of Laboratory Procedures and Techniques I and II. A review of health and safety standards will help to ensure students’ well being and safety. Parasitology, virology and immunology will be stressed this semester. Abnormal hematology and chemistry cases will be reviewed to provide continuing development of laboratory expertise. The final exam for this semester will cover material from the first two semesters as well as the third semester. Prerequisite:VT2016 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques II, VT3073 Clinical Exercises II.

VT3053 Surgical Exercises I
This course is a practical training session for veterinary technicians to become familiar with anesthesia and surgical procedures. There is a heavy emphasis on supervised hands on experience. The class is divided into small groups for better supervision and learning. Each group is responsible for taking a patient from the preoperative examination and laboratory evaluation through to patient recovery and return to the owner. Prerequisites: VT2008 Anatomy and Physiology II; VT2033 Clinical Studies II; VT3073 Clinical Exercises II; VT2016 Laboratory Procedures and Techniques II; VT2002 Clinical Calculations II.

VT3063 Pharmaceutical Principles I
This is the first of two courses which together provide a comprehensive review of important groups of drugs used in veterinary medicine. The course begins with general aspects of pharmacology, such as the sources of drugs, their modes of action, dosage forms and pharmacokinetics, but progresses to discuss in detail those drugs which are used to correct disorders in specific body systems. In this first course, drugs affe